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How to Repurpose Copywriting for Maximum Value

Increase Your Exposure and Results by Repurposing Your Purchased Sales Copy.

Sometimes it can be hard to swallow a five-figure price tag for high quality, unique and targeted content and sales materials. Yet some businesses do it all the time. They have no issue whatsoever with paying 10 or even 20 thousand dollars for a single sales letter. Why is that?

Do they have a super high-priced product that’s going to give them a huge return? Maybe.

Are they just so wealthy that they don’t care how much things cost?

Probably not.

Do they know a secret you don’t know?

Most likely, yes.

I share this secret with my clients all the time, and it totally changes how they value the writing they pay for. It doesn’t seem fair that some business owners know the secret, and some don’t. So, I’m going to share it with you.

The Secret to Maximizing the Value of Purchased Copywriting

The secret is simple: Rearrange and repurpose your content.

Once you’ve paid for a piece of copywriting, it’s yours to do with as you please. That means you can chop it up, release it in pieces, use bits and bobs for different things.

Things like:

  • Web Pages
  • Email Autoresponders
  • Whitepapers
  • Press Releases
  • Article Marketing
  • Newsletters
  • Blog Posts
  • Twitter Posts
  • Social Media Bookmarking
  • Special Reports
  • Direct Mail
  • Advertorials
  • Speeches
  • Print Ads

The list goes on and on.

It’s easy to get more than $30,000 of value from a $10,000 sales letter.  Here’s how:

Let’s say you paid $10,000 for a well-written, persuasive long-form sales letter. That’s a lot of dough, but not unreasonable when you have a solid product or service and a high-quality list of prospects to sell to. But a savvy business owner like you will work that copy for all it’s worth.

The first thing you do is put the entire sales letter on a web landing page. Easy peasy.

Now, every sales letter should have certain elements in it, each of which corresponds to a certain page on a more traditional style website. Here’s how it breaks down:

Sales Letter Component:                                                Web Page:

Credibility builder                                                          About/Bio

Objections                                                                        FAQ

Offer, Guarantee                                                            Products/Services

Testimonials                                                                   Clients/Case Studies/Testimonials

Order section                                                                  Contact

USP                                                                                   Our Philosophy

So, it’s a simple matter of breaking the sales letter apart and using the copy sections as the corresponding pages on a traditional site.  Essentially, you’re getting two websites for the price of one.  You can either use each one for a different audience, or split-test them against the same audience to see which one converts better. That’s at least $5,000 saved.

Next, you decide to take out the section of the sales letter that builds your credibility and use it as a press release—about $1,000 saved.

Then you take each one of the objections dealt with in the letter and reformat it as an article. You repurpose these for blog posts and email autoresponders. If you have, say, seven of them—you’ve saved about $1,750.

Now you’re on a roll. What else can you use the copy for?

Every well-written subhead makes a nice Twitter post—you’ve saved time, if not money.

Then you realize you can take each blog entry and post it to social bookmarking sites—gaining you lots of SEO value.

You combined the headline, a testimonial and the offer to make a print ad—Another $1,000 saved.

Someone on your staff says he needs a whitepaper to give away at a convention he’s speaking at. Why pay up to $10,000 for that? You’ve already got one. Just rearrange and print out a combination of your FAQ, case studies and weave in your offer and contact page.

Wait, your original sales letter doubles as a direct mail piece. All you need to do is take out a juicy testimonial and reformat that as a lift letter—Another $10,000 project you don’t have to pay for.

Do you see how a little creativity and a WELL WRITTEN sales letter can save you more than you invested in the first place?

And that’s before you start counting the orders that come in from all these marketing efforts.

The key, of course, is that you must be sure you’re getting the very best writing possible.  And that means investing in a bit more in a copywriter on the front end.  If you’re not comfortable doing the rearranging yourself, often your writer will work with you to repurpose the piece for nominal fee (or even free.)

So, before you decide to go with a cut-rate copywriter because they’re cheaper. Think about the long-term needs of your marketing plan. If you’re going to end up hiring out all the writing anyway, doesn’t it make more sense to invest in the best you can get and maximize the value of every word?